How wonderful it is that opportunities to practice yoga abound here in NYC. But even for those who consider themselves knowledgeable, the sheer variety of styles can be confusing- Hatha Yoga? Hot Yoga? Ashtanga? Sivananda? Kundalini? Vinyasa? Vinyasa flow? Viniyoga? Which is right for you?

PHOTO: MacKenzie Pause-Hurley

PHOTO: MacKenzie Pause-Hurley

Central to that question is the teacher with whom you choose to work. First and foremost she or he should be a practitioner in an ongoing dialogue with and exploration of all the elements of practice, not simply the physical postures. Competent teaching rests on that bedrock.

Next, it’s important to assess a teacher’s capacity to recognize and adapt to your particular circumstance. Yoga is not one-size-fits-all. While the tools of practice may overlap from person to person, each student is unique in her/his intention and desires. Work with a teacher who listens carefully to you, sees the best in you and believes in your potential, and then teaches you how to practice so you can meet your current needs and progress towards longer-term goals.

Photo Credit: Mackenzie pause-hurley

Photo Credit: Mackenzie pause-hurley

With each of my students, I seek to

  • Create and hold a safe space for inquiry and exploration
  • Offer the full array of traditional yoga teachings and tools, conveyed in a way that is a meaningful to the individual and builds on personal interest
  • Help students identify habits and patterns that may stand in the way of finding contentment and joy
  • Encourage personal, consistent practice
  • Foster a compassionate awareness of “right relationship” to self, family, friends and the larger community
  • Support the quest for a life lived with intention and purpose
  • Awaken and deepen connections to the body’s wisdom and especially to the breath